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petersutherland:

tyshawn for supreme / popeye mag japan 
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jheneaiko:

http://www.elle.com
jheneaiko:

http://www.elle.com
jheneaiko:

http://www.elle.com
jheneaiko:

http://www.elle.com
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deviantart:

+Watch uterathmann
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deviantart:

Artwork by MikaNitta
via TGA-Tsurugi's Favourites
deviantart:

Artwork by MikaNitta
via TGA-Tsurugi's Favourites
deviantart:

Artwork by MikaNitta
via TGA-Tsurugi's Favourites
deviantart:

Artwork by MikaNitta
via TGA-Tsurugi's Favourites
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marnla:

cuscatlanaziz:

iran and india being fashion girlfriends

I always reblog this bc it looks like
askmeagaintomorrow
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fu-co:

AKIRA
fu-co:

AKIRA
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macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
macxpv:

micdotcom:

Photos of Keke Palmer’s debut as Cinderella will bring tears to your eyes

Keke Palmer took the stage Tuesday night as the title character in Broadway’s Cinderella, marking the first time an African-American actress has played the role on theater’s biggest stage. 
"Dreams do come true" | Follow micdotcom


EVERYTHING
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meloxtra:

NEW MIXTAPE
steve-ography:

MeLo-X - Inside The Mind Of MeLo 4 (Mixtape)
Click HERE To Stream
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coolstuffliveshere:

dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.
On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:
"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”
Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”
Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.
The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.
Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.
Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.
Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

Never forget
coolstuffliveshere:

dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.
On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:
"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”
Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”
Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.
The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.
Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.
Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.
Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

Never forget
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beautiesofafrique:

African mythology of the week: Nana Burukú isthe Supreme Deity of the Fon from Dahomey. In Dahomey mythology, Nana Burukú is an androgynous deity creator of the Universe and all that exists in it. Twins were born to Nana Burukú : the moon God Mawu and the sun God Lisa. Nana Burukú was also incorporated into the Yorùbá religion as Yemaja, the female thought of the male creator Ashe and the effective cause of all further creation. 
In the Beginning, Nana Burukú , the Cosmic Mother carried nothing but Darkness in her Womb. She wanted to experience Creation and gave birth to all the Universes, Galaxies, Suns, Moons, Planets, Worlds, Beings and all Elements visible and invisible.
To rule the Cosmic System, she birthed Mawu and Lisa (as stated above). From the Union of Mawu and Lissa came the entire Pantheon of Deities that govern all aspects of the Universe and Life. 
Nana is the primordial mother of the universe and of the earth. Nana Burukú is in charge of all maternal issues pertaining to females. She is the spirit of the earth and the moon. Nana Burukú is a wise old woman who likes to tend to herself and also watching over her grandchildren and the earth. She is petitioned for health issues or to help aid in a pregnancy whether if it is to obtain or destroy a pregnancy. Nana Burukú only terminates pregnancies if the woman has been raped and doesn’t want to give birth to the child. Nana Burukú is also an orisha of justice when rape or wrong maternal instincts are at bay. Nana Burukú essence was here long before the essence of the earth. She is the rays and the motion of the moon. When Olodumare made the earth it was Nana Burukú who was in charge of looking down on the earth and with her light from the moon to navigate us humans on earth. 
Nana Burukú is seen near rivers and oceans. She is the ultimate mother of the waters especially the sweet river waters. Oshun domain is the sweet river waters, but its through her mother Nana Burukú, where she gets the river waters from.  She is also seen in the middle of whirlpools where her offerings are left. The woody marsh areas as well belong to Nana Burukú. 
Nana Burukú is the grandmother of all of the orishas as she was married to Obatala at one point and she nurtured them when they were born. People say that Yembo and Nana Burukú are the same entity. Yembo gave birth to the orishas and Nana Burukú looked after them from the sky and nurtured them all. When Nana Burukú was in the Yoruba cult, she was in the manifestation of Yembo who was violated by her son Ogun. Due to that disgrace she fled to Dahomey and the regions of Brazil where she was recognized as the great Nana Burukú. Her name means “The great wise Buruku” or “Wicked Grandmother” 
(She is celebrated as Nanã in Brazilian Candomblé Jejé and Candomblé Ketu, where she is pictured as a very old woman, older than creation itself; as Nana Buruku, primordial swamp spirit in Orisha tradition. Today the Yorùbá religion, and all its branches, is still practiced by tens of millions of people all over the world and Nana Buluku has an honored place in their faith.)
Read more/Sources: 1| 2| 3| 
beautiesofafrique:

African mythology of the week: Nana Burukú isthe Supreme Deity of the Fon from Dahomey. In Dahomey mythology, Nana Burukú is an androgynous deity creator of the Universe and all that exists in it. Twins were born to Nana Burukú : the moon God Mawu and the sun God Lisa. Nana Burukú was also incorporated into the Yorùbá religion as Yemaja, the female thought of the male creator Ashe and the effective cause of all further creation. 
In the Beginning, Nana Burukú , the Cosmic Mother carried nothing but Darkness in her Womb. She wanted to experience Creation and gave birth to all the Universes, Galaxies, Suns, Moons, Planets, Worlds, Beings and all Elements visible and invisible.
To rule the Cosmic System, she birthed Mawu and Lisa (as stated above). From the Union of Mawu and Lissa came the entire Pantheon of Deities that govern all aspects of the Universe and Life. 
Nana is the primordial mother of the universe and of the earth. Nana Burukú is in charge of all maternal issues pertaining to females. She is the spirit of the earth and the moon. Nana Burukú is a wise old woman who likes to tend to herself and also watching over her grandchildren and the earth. She is petitioned for health issues or to help aid in a pregnancy whether if it is to obtain or destroy a pregnancy. Nana Burukú only terminates pregnancies if the woman has been raped and doesn’t want to give birth to the child. Nana Burukú is also an orisha of justice when rape or wrong maternal instincts are at bay. Nana Burukú essence was here long before the essence of the earth. She is the rays and the motion of the moon. When Olodumare made the earth it was Nana Burukú who was in charge of looking down on the earth and with her light from the moon to navigate us humans on earth. 
Nana Burukú is seen near rivers and oceans. She is the ultimate mother of the waters especially the sweet river waters. Oshun domain is the sweet river waters, but its through her mother Nana Burukú, where she gets the river waters from.  She is also seen in the middle of whirlpools where her offerings are left. The woody marsh areas as well belong to Nana Burukú. 
Nana Burukú is the grandmother of all of the orishas as she was married to Obatala at one point and she nurtured them when they were born. People say that Yembo and Nana Burukú are the same entity. Yembo gave birth to the orishas and Nana Burukú looked after them from the sky and nurtured them all. When Nana Burukú was in the Yoruba cult, she was in the manifestation of Yembo who was violated by her son Ogun. Due to that disgrace she fled to Dahomey and the regions of Brazil where she was recognized as the great Nana Burukú. Her name means “The great wise Buruku” or “Wicked Grandmother” 
(She is celebrated as Nanã in Brazilian Candomblé Jejé and Candomblé Ketu, where she is pictured as a very old woman, older than creation itself; as Nana Buruku, primordial swamp spirit in Orisha tradition. Today the Yorùbá religion, and all its branches, is still practiced by tens of millions of people all over the world and Nana Buluku has an honored place in their faith.)
Read more/Sources: 1| 2| 3| 
beautiesofafrique:

African mythology of the week: Nana Burukú isthe Supreme Deity of the Fon from Dahomey. In Dahomey mythology, Nana Burukú is an androgynous deity creator of the Universe and all that exists in it. Twins were born to Nana Burukú : the moon God Mawu and the sun God Lisa. Nana Burukú was also incorporated into the Yorùbá religion as Yemaja, the female thought of the male creator Ashe and the effective cause of all further creation. 
In the Beginning, Nana Burukú , the Cosmic Mother carried nothing but Darkness in her Womb. She wanted to experience Creation and gave birth to all the Universes, Galaxies, Suns, Moons, Planets, Worlds, Beings and all Elements visible and invisible.
To rule the Cosmic System, she birthed Mawu and Lisa (as stated above). From the Union of Mawu and Lissa came the entire Pantheon of Deities that govern all aspects of the Universe and Life. 
Nana is the primordial mother of the universe and of the earth. Nana Burukú is in charge of all maternal issues pertaining to females. She is the spirit of the earth and the moon. Nana Burukú is a wise old woman who likes to tend to herself and also watching over her grandchildren and the earth. She is petitioned for health issues or to help aid in a pregnancy whether if it is to obtain or destroy a pregnancy. Nana Burukú only terminates pregnancies if the woman has been raped and doesn’t want to give birth to the child. Nana Burukú is also an orisha of justice when rape or wrong maternal instincts are at bay. Nana Burukú essence was here long before the essence of the earth. She is the rays and the motion of the moon. When Olodumare made the earth it was Nana Burukú who was in charge of looking down on the earth and with her light from the moon to navigate us humans on earth. 
Nana Burukú is seen near rivers and oceans. She is the ultimate mother of the waters especially the sweet river waters. Oshun domain is the sweet river waters, but its through her mother Nana Burukú, where she gets the river waters from.  She is also seen in the middle of whirlpools where her offerings are left. The woody marsh areas as well belong to Nana Burukú. 
Nana Burukú is the grandmother of all of the orishas as she was married to Obatala at one point and she nurtured them when they were born. People say that Yembo and Nana Burukú are the same entity. Yembo gave birth to the orishas and Nana Burukú looked after them from the sky and nurtured them all. When Nana Burukú was in the Yoruba cult, she was in the manifestation of Yembo who was violated by her son Ogun. Due to that disgrace she fled to Dahomey and the regions of Brazil where she was recognized as the great Nana Burukú. Her name means “The great wise Buruku” or “Wicked Grandmother” 
(She is celebrated as Nanã in Brazilian Candomblé Jejé and Candomblé Ketu, where she is pictured as a very old woman, older than creation itself; as Nana Buruku, primordial swamp spirit in Orisha tradition. Today the Yorùbá religion, and all its branches, is still practiced by tens of millions of people all over the world and Nana Buluku has an honored place in their faith.)
Read more/Sources: 1| 2| 3| 
beautiesofafrique:

African mythology of the week: Nana Burukú isthe Supreme Deity of the Fon from Dahomey. In Dahomey mythology, Nana Burukú is an androgynous deity creator of the Universe and all that exists in it. Twins were born to Nana Burukú : the moon God Mawu and the sun God Lisa. Nana Burukú was also incorporated into the Yorùbá religion as Yemaja, the female thought of the male creator Ashe and the effective cause of all further creation. 
In the Beginning, Nana Burukú , the Cosmic Mother carried nothing but Darkness in her Womb. She wanted to experience Creation and gave birth to all the Universes, Galaxies, Suns, Moons, Planets, Worlds, Beings and all Elements visible and invisible.
To rule the Cosmic System, she birthed Mawu and Lisa (as stated above). From the Union of Mawu and Lissa came the entire Pantheon of Deities that govern all aspects of the Universe and Life. 
Nana is the primordial mother of the universe and of the earth. Nana Burukú is in charge of all maternal issues pertaining to females. She is the spirit of the earth and the moon. Nana Burukú is a wise old woman who likes to tend to herself and also watching over her grandchildren and the earth. She is petitioned for health issues or to help aid in a pregnancy whether if it is to obtain or destroy a pregnancy. Nana Burukú only terminates pregnancies if the woman has been raped and doesn’t want to give birth to the child. Nana Burukú is also an orisha of justice when rape or wrong maternal instincts are at bay. Nana Burukú essence was here long before the essence of the earth. She is the rays and the motion of the moon. When Olodumare made the earth it was Nana Burukú who was in charge of looking down on the earth and with her light from the moon to navigate us humans on earth. 
Nana Burukú is seen near rivers and oceans. She is the ultimate mother of the waters especially the sweet river waters. Oshun domain is the sweet river waters, but its through her mother Nana Burukú, where she gets the river waters from.  She is also seen in the middle of whirlpools where her offerings are left. The woody marsh areas as well belong to Nana Burukú. 
Nana Burukú is the grandmother of all of the orishas as she was married to Obatala at one point and she nurtured them when they were born. People say that Yembo and Nana Burukú are the same entity. Yembo gave birth to the orishas and Nana Burukú looked after them from the sky and nurtured them all. When Nana Burukú was in the Yoruba cult, she was in the manifestation of Yembo who was violated by her son Ogun. Due to that disgrace she fled to Dahomey and the regions of Brazil where she was recognized as the great Nana Burukú. Her name means “The great wise Buruku” or “Wicked Grandmother” 
(She is celebrated as Nanã in Brazilian Candomblé Jejé and Candomblé Ketu, where she is pictured as a very old woman, older than creation itself; as Nana Buruku, primordial swamp spirit in Orisha tradition. Today the Yorùbá religion, and all its branches, is still practiced by tens of millions of people all over the world and Nana Buluku has an honored place in their faith.)
Read more/Sources: 1| 2| 3| 
beautiesofafrique:

African mythology of the week: Nana Burukú isthe Supreme Deity of the Fon from Dahomey. In Dahomey mythology, Nana Burukú is an androgynous deity creator of the Universe and all that exists in it. Twins were born to Nana Burukú : the moon God Mawu and the sun God Lisa. Nana Burukú was also incorporated into the Yorùbá religion as Yemaja, the female thought of the male creator Ashe and the effective cause of all further creation. 
In the Beginning, Nana Burukú , the Cosmic Mother carried nothing but Darkness in her Womb. She wanted to experience Creation and gave birth to all the Universes, Galaxies, Suns, Moons, Planets, Worlds, Beings and all Elements visible and invisible.
To rule the Cosmic System, she birthed Mawu and Lisa (as stated above). From the Union of Mawu and Lissa came the entire Pantheon of Deities that govern all aspects of the Universe and Life. 
Nana is the primordial mother of the universe and of the earth. Nana Burukú is in charge of all maternal issues pertaining to females. She is the spirit of the earth and the moon. Nana Burukú is a wise old woman who likes to tend to herself and also watching over her grandchildren and the earth. She is petitioned for health issues or to help aid in a pregnancy whether if it is to obtain or destroy a pregnancy. Nana Burukú only terminates pregnancies if the woman has been raped and doesn’t want to give birth to the child. Nana Burukú is also an orisha of justice when rape or wrong maternal instincts are at bay. Nana Burukú essence was here long before the essence of the earth. She is the rays and the motion of the moon. When Olodumare made the earth it was Nana Burukú who was in charge of looking down on the earth and with her light from the moon to navigate us humans on earth. 
Nana Burukú is seen near rivers and oceans. She is the ultimate mother of the waters especially the sweet river waters. Oshun domain is the sweet river waters, but its through her mother Nana Burukú, where she gets the river waters from.  She is also seen in the middle of whirlpools where her offerings are left. The woody marsh areas as well belong to Nana Burukú. 
Nana Burukú is the grandmother of all of the orishas as she was married to Obatala at one point and she nurtured them when they were born. People say that Yembo and Nana Burukú are the same entity. Yembo gave birth to the orishas and Nana Burukú looked after them from the sky and nurtured them all. When Nana Burukú was in the Yoruba cult, she was in the manifestation of Yembo who was violated by her son Ogun. Due to that disgrace she fled to Dahomey and the regions of Brazil where she was recognized as the great Nana Burukú. Her name means “The great wise Buruku” or “Wicked Grandmother” 
(She is celebrated as Nanã in Brazilian Candomblé Jejé and Candomblé Ketu, where she is pictured as a very old woman, older than creation itself; as Nana Buruku, primordial swamp spirit in Orisha tradition. Today the Yorùbá religion, and all its branches, is still practiced by tens of millions of people all over the world and Nana Buluku has an honored place in their faith.)
Read more/Sources: 1| 2| 3| 
+
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
iwriteaboutfeminism:

City Council meeting on Tuesday night in Ferguson. Part 4.
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artistiquesoul:

Canvas printed copy for sale, 11 x 20in $50. Email charicelundyart@gmail.com to purchase.